1. On living in sin

    dearcoquette:

    How do I break it to my religious, highly conservative parents that I’m moving in with my boyfriend? Just to provide some context: they got me a “purity ring” for Christmas when I was fourteen, and they likely still maintain delusions of my virginity. I don’t want to hurt them, and I really don’t want to irreparably damage my relationship with them, but I need to move on with my life and I feel like it’s time that I stop living according to their values and not my own. Every time my mom hears about someone moving in with their significant other before marriage, she snarks about “living in sin.” Is there a way to manage this situation respectfully and relatively calmly?


    I don’t know your age, but I’m guessing early twenties. Based on your grammar and punctuation, I’m also guessing college educated. In other words, you’re an adult — young, but nonetheless fully capable of making life decisions according to your own set of moral standards.

    It’s good that you want to remain respectful, but you need to start making a distinction between showing respect for your parents and showing respect for their belief system. They aren’t the same thing.

    Showing respect for your parents means being honest and straightforward with them about your decision to move in with your boyfriend. It also means being patient as they come to terms with the fact that you’re an adult who makes her own decisions. Beyond that, though, you don’t have to put up with their conservative religious bullshit…


    Read the rest of this week’s column over at Nerve.com.

  2. raindropsonrosetyler:

outweighingthebad:

the poster lights were out and I just

thAT IS NOT OkAY

    raindropsonrosetyler:

    outweighingthebad:

    the poster lights were out and I just

    thAT IS NOT OkAY

  3. marinashutup:

    mach712:

    celeryandhummus:

    (x)

    kristen loves women and she doesn’t take shit

    It’s wonderful how much of this game she is not playing.

    I love and respect Kristen Stewart so much UGH

    (Source: dailystews)

  4. (Source: breathinginpairs)

  5. (Source: muchholyverytrinity)

  6. newsweek:

A Statistical Analysis of the Work of Bob Ross | FiveThirtyEight

Important statistic to note: trees per painting, happy or otherwise.

    newsweek:

    A Statistical Analysis of the Work of Bob Ross | FiveThirtyEight

    Important statistic to note: trees per painting, happy or otherwise.

  7. diversityinya:

    A Diverse Dozen

    Looking for some YA books that just happen to have characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters? Here’s a diverse dozen titles with something for every reader — contemporary, fantasy, science fiction, and mystery too. (Descriptions are from WorldCat.)

    Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac (Tu Books) — In a world that has barely survived an apocalypse that leaves it with pre-twentieth century technology, Lozen is a monster hunter for four tyrants who are holding her family hostage.

    Pointe by Brandy Colbert (Putnam) — Four years after Theo’s best friend, Donovan, disappeared at age thirteen, he is found and brought home and Theo puts her health at risk as she decides whether to tell the truth about the abductor, knowing her revelation could end her life-long dream of becoming a professional ballet dancer.

    If I Ever Get Out of Here by Eric Gansworth (Arthur A. Levine Books) — Seventh-grader Lewis “Shoe” Blake from the Tuscarora Reservation has a new friend, George Haddonfield from the local Air Force base, but in 1975 upstate New York there is a lot of tension and hatred between Native Americans and Whites–and Lewis is not sure that he can rely on friendship.

    Fake ID by Lamar Giles (Amistad) — “An African-American teen in the Witness Protection Program moves to a new town and finds himself trying to solve a murder mystery when his first friend is found dead.

    To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han (Simon & Schuster) — Lara Jean writes love letters to all the boys she has loved and then hides them in a hatbox until one day those letters are accidentally sent.

    Pantomime by Laura Lam (Strange Chemistry) — Gene, the daughter of a noble family, runs away from the decadence of court to R.H. Ragona’s circus of magic, where she meets runaway Micah, whose blood could unlock the mysteries of the world of Ellada.

    Summer of the Mariposas by Guadalupe Garcia McCall (Tu Books) — In an adventure reminiscent of Homer’s Odyssey, fifteen-year-old Odilia and her four younger sisters embark on a journey to return a dead man to his family in Mexico, aided by La Llorona, but impeded by a witch, a warlock, chupacabras, and more.

    Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass by Meg Medina (Candlewick) — One morning before school, some girl tells Piddy Sanchez that Yaqui Delgado hates her and wants to kick her ass. Piddy doesn’t even know who Yaqui is, never mind what she’s done to piss her off. Word is that Yaqui thinks Piddy is stuck-up, shakes her stuff when she walks, and isn’t Latin enough with her white skin, good grades, and no accent. And Yaqui isn’t kidding around, so Piddy better watch her back. At first Piddy is more concerned with trying to find out more about the father she’s never met and how to balance honors courses with her weekend job at the neighborhood hair salon. But as the harassment escalates, avoiding Yaqui and her gang starts to take over Piddy’s life. Is there any way for Piddy to survive without closing herself off or running away?

    Rogue by Lyn Miller-Lachmann (Nancy Paulsen Books) — An eighth-grade girl with Asperger’s syndrome tries to befriend her new neighbor, facing many challenges along the way.

    More Than This by Patrick Ness (Candlewick) — A boy named Seth drowns, losing his life as the pounding sea claims him. But then he wakes. He is naked, thirsty, starving. But alive. How is that possible? He remembers dying. So how is he here? And where is this place? It looks like the suburban English town where he lived as a child, before an unthinkable tragedy happened and his family moved to America. But the neighborhood around his old house is overgrown, covered in dust, and completely abandoned. What’s going on? And why is it that whenever he closes his eyes, he falls prey to vivid, agonizing memories that seem more real than the world around him? Seth begins a search for answers, hoping that he might not be alone, trapped in a crumbling, abandoned world.

    Prophecy by Ellen Oh (HarperTeen) —A demon slayer, the only female warrior in the King’s army, must battle demon soldiers, an evil shaman, and the Demon Lord to find the lost ruby of the Dragon King’s prophecy and save her kingdom.

    Far From You by Tess Sharpe (Hyperion) — After Sophie Winters survives a brutal attack in which her best friend, Mina, is murdered, she sets out to find the killer. At the same time she must prove she is free of her past Oxy addiction and in no way to blame for Mina’s death.

  8. frantzfandom:

crasstoise:

thatssoproblematic:

Posted on FiveThirtyEight this morning. Some interesting things to take away from this:
-White men appear to be the least racially motivated when it comes to online dating. Who knew? -White women are looking waaaaaay more racist than their male counterparts. -Black men have very little interest in dating black women. -The article (not represented in this graphic though) talked about how women are more likely message someone who uses similar adjectives to describe themselves. So like, if a woman says she’s “creative and physically fit” she’s likely to message guys who describe themselves as “creative and psychically fit.” Men didn’t have that same tendency.  -Korean dudes are super into Korean girls.

The gap between black men’s interest in black women and vice versa (in dating and all sorts of other things) is pretty depressing, and it goes a long way towards explaining why What About Our Daughters is a thing.
The white guy isn’t too surprising, since in western societies (the ones that OKCupid, Eharmony, etc are culturally skewed to), they’re seen as the default, and are thus usually judged on individual merit rather than on race. The treatment received, then, seems to be the treatment doled back out. What this graph doesn’t show, however, is how likely folks are to respond to people of specific races. 

this isn’t really surprising but it skews kind of differently than okcupid’s data set published a few years agoI wonder if it’s because eharmony’s userbase tends to be older + has to pay

    frantzfandom:

    crasstoise:

    thatssoproblematic:

    Posted on FiveThirtyEight this morning. Some interesting things to take away from this:

    -White men appear to be the least racially motivated when it comes to online dating. Who knew?
    -White women are looking waaaaaay more racist than their male counterparts.
    -Black men have very little interest in dating black women.
    -The article (not represented in this graphic though) talked about how women are more likely message someone who uses similar adjectives to describe themselves. So like, if a woman says she’s “creative and physically fit” she’s likely to message guys who describe themselves as “creative and psychically fit.” Men didn’t have that same tendency.
    -Korean dudes are super into Korean girls.

    The gap between black men’s interest in black women and vice versa (in dating and all sorts of other things) is pretty depressing, and it goes a long way towards explaining why What About Our Daughters is a thing.

    The white guy isn’t too surprising, since in western societies (the ones that OKCupid, Eharmony, etc are culturally skewed to), they’re seen as the default, and are thus usually judged on individual merit rather than on race. The treatment received, then, seems to be the treatment doled back out. What this graph doesn’t show, however, is how likely folks are to respond to people of specific races. 

    this isn’t really surprising but it skews kind of differently than okcupid’s data set published a few years ago

    I wonder if it’s because eharmony’s userbase tends to be older + has to pay

  9. shiyoonkim:

all alone during winter break at hogwarts*

    shiyoonkim:

    all alone during winter break at hogwarts*